W. F. Price #sexist web.archive.org

In all likelihood, the death toll will be in the thousands, but as grim as that sounds, it could have been far, far worse. Tragedies are still unfolding in Japan, but the people of the island nation are, for the most part, taking care of their own. American search and rescue teams are helping search for survivors, and US Navy helicopters are airlifting food to stranded Japanese civilians, but the bulk of the rescue effort is being undertaken by Japanese. Overwhelmingly, of course, Japanese men. And the women are not complaining. Even the feminists in the US are eerily silent on this score.

When you have a society in which men have a vested interest in protecting and taking care of the whole, and they are allowed to do so, they tend to do a good job. They display selflessness and their efforts are characterized by cooperation and teamwork; often by heroism as well. On the whole, everyone does better. There is no better example of this than the comparison between matriarchal Haiti’s and patriarchal Japan’s respective responses to natural disaster. Where in Haiti the women are still living in open encampments well over a year after the quake, Japanese women are already sheltered, which is necessary, because it is still cold in northern Japan this time of year. There is no doubt that some displaced Japanese will still be facing significant hardship a year from now, but despite Japan’s crowded land vanishingly few will be without a roof over their head, and none will go hungry.

As for the Japanese men, they have it far better than their Haitian counterparts as well. There are no foreign troops pointing guns at them and denying them food, they are taken care of and respected if old, and given jobs and a place in society if young. Perhaps most importantly, They are given the opportunity to do what men often do best — they are allowed to take care of their families and communities.

As we observe these events and their aftermath, they provide us with valuable lessons about nature of things, and give us an opportunity to ask ourselves what kind of a society we want to live in. Do we want, as the feminists would have it, to be helpless, disease infested, homeless and starving if we face hardship, or do we want to have the ability to come together and pull ourselves up from the rubble? For the sane people of the world, the choice is clear.

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[Comments by the same fundie]

These things you list all derive exactly from the matriarchal nature of Haitian society. Or perhaps if Haitian women hadn’t been “oppressed” they would have built sound structures and prepared for emergencies — just like the Japanese, whose women surely are mainly responsible for Japan’s engineering, architecture and emergency response…

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Matriarchal societies are characterized by the presence of a few dominant men at the top who command gangs of dispossessed, disaffected young men who grew up not knowing daddy.

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[When you know less about Japanese metalworking than your average weeb but still pretend to be a history buff on the internet]

My take on the race thing:

Of course races are not all the same. But it wasn’t my intention to make an issue out of race in the article.

However, if you look at history, it’s pretty obvious that more patriarchal societies are the ones that became increasingly safe, orderly and technologically advanced. Was Japan advanced 2,000 years ago? Not really. It wasn’t until they adopted elements of Chinese philosophy (e.g. Confucianism) that Japan began to take on its modern characteristics. Before that it was matrifocal (good point Jack made) and characterized by tribal warfare the same as Africa or Haiti. So was Northern Europe, for that matter, before the Romans introduced civilization.

Sooo… Whether or not Haitian people could be immediately turned into Japanese is not the issue. The thing is, however, that by thrusting feminism on them nobody is doing them any favors at all. On the other hand, if given some workable patriarchal civilized set of rules, in time the place would improve instead of continuing along as a mess. I think Africa and African-derived societies are a great place to look at how patriarchal/matrifocal societies play out.

Patriarchal organization of society works on two different timeframes: the present and the future. It definitely makes improvements in the present, but the effects over generations can add up quite a bit as well. We have to keep in mind that the Japanese were living in the stone age just a little over 2,000 years ago — even the natives of the far-flung British Isles had been working metal for thousands of years by then.

Here’s a lecture describingthe transition of Japan from matrilinear/matrifocal society to strict patriarchy over the years, largely under the influence of foreign ideas such as Confucianism and Buddhism (yes, Buddhism is male-dominated like Abrahamic religions).

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Confused?

So were we! You can find all of this, and more, on Fundies Say the Darndest Things!

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