Quote# 2799

If there really was a big bang, why are planets near perfect in size. I mean if it was a giant explosion, wouldn't the planets be in different shapes and sizes. Why isn't there a planet in like the shape of an asteriod or such?

Steven22, Battle Forums 28 Comments [4/1/2003 12:00:00 AM]
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Anonymous

...

We have those. They're called \"asteroids\".

In all fairness, all other stellar bodies aside ARE identical in every regard, as a direct result of the Big Bang, which happened several thousand years before the extinction of the dinosaurs and near-instantaneous subsequent evolution of humanity.

So he's got us there, I guess.

11/22/2006 5:34:48 PM

David D.G.

When you get enough mass together in one place, gravity forces it to even out into as close to a sphere as it can get. Only the smallest solid bodies (say, 500 miles or less in diameter) have insufficient mass to do this, so their shape is irregular.

Science isn't that hard, Steven22. It's also pretty sensible once you get into how things work.


~David D.G.

11/22/2006 6:08:50 PM

Star Cluster

Most planets are different sizes. They range from Mercury, which is barely bigger than our moon, to Jupiter, which is more massive than the rest of the planets in our solar system combined.

And even some asteroids are round because they have sufficient mass to make them round. Ceres, for instance, is an asteroid in the belt between Mars and Jupiter, that is round, was considered a planet when discovered in the 1800's, and was almost given that classification again recently.

As to your question, show me a square planet and then I will say God did it.

11/22/2006 6:21:23 PM

wackadoodle

wouldn't the planets be in different shapes and sizes

goddamn homeschooling.

1/4/2009 6:01:13 AM

verxintRising

FAIL

4/5/2009 3:00:02 PM

Science

Look me up! I have multiple books.

9/15/2010 11:42:35 AM

Angua

What do you even mean?

Yes, planets are round (well, obviously, they aren't perfect spheres, but I suppose that this fact is kind of beside the point at the moment). And do you know why they are round? Have you ever hear of this thing called gravity? It's a fairly recent discovery. Isaac Newton only figured it out a few hundred years ago, so I understand if your not entirely up to date on it.

And, there are these asteroid-shaped things that orbit stars. They are called asteroids. Asteroids are typically smaller than planets . . . which might possibly why they typically aren't as spherical ( I think it kind of has something to do with that novel concept of "gravity" I mentioned earlier).

9/15/2010 12:19:31 PM

Swede

Gravity and 13 billion years. Next question.

9/15/2010 12:27:08 PM


9/15/2010 12:30:44 PM

Canadiest

All of the above.
Plus:
These people think Big Bang: instant planets and suns. Planets and Suns flew out of the Big Bang they've been told. And who told them that?
Biblical Creationists. Preachers of the word. Scientists have never suggested such a thing. Time's been removed from the equation

And they claim they don't idolize people

9/15/2010 1:44:32 PM

Blasphemina

Fundies come from the square planet. Gays come from the triangle planet.

9/15/2010 7:41:16 PM

Space mann

There things that would constitute as a planet if they followed similar patterns around a star, they're called asteroids

9/15/2010 7:42:22 PM

Justanotheratheist

The orbiting china teapot is different in shape and size to other celestial objects. So you lose.

9/16/2010 1:45:41 AM

Allegory for Jesus

lern 2 gravity

10/4/2010 5:28:03 PM



If there really was a big bang, why are planets near perfect in size. I mean if it was a giant explosion, wouldn't the planets be in different shapes and sizes. Why isn't there a planet in like the shape of an asteriod or such?

Hey Steven, there's a drunk knight at the door with a big sledgehammer asking for you; looks really, REALLY pissed off. Says his name is Isaac and he has a quarrel to settle with you.

10/5/2010 1:31:13 AM

Tempus

If there really was a big bang, why are planets near perfect in size. I mean if it was a giant explosion, wouldn't the planets be in different shapes and sizes



Why isn't there a planet in like the shape of an asteriod or such?





See also: Minor Planet

10/5/2010 1:54:17 AM

Canama

They are and there is.

Any questions?

3/1/2011 10:23:01 PM

Tempus

Ahh, nostalgia...

3/1/2011 11:10:00 PM

Anon2

First, planets can differ greatly in size,

and second: The planets didn't come into existence at the big bang. They came into existence millions of years later, by a completely different effect (gravitational aggregation)

3/2/2011 1:58:43 AM

navelgazer

Gravitydidit!

3/2/2011 7:24:59 AM

Robespierre

Because a sphere is - demonstrably - the shape that holds a given volume in the tightest surface and shortest distance from the center. Therefore, mass pulled together by gravity tends to shape itself as a sphere. This is partially countered by rotation, so that planets are actually fatter at the equator than a perfect sphere. For example, the radius of the Earth at the Equator is 6378.1 km, while the distance between the poles is only 6356.8 km.

7/8/2011 6:11:58 PM

Quantum Mechanic

Why do people this stupid waste air?

2/12/2012 1:53:12 AM

FuriosFran

They're also always neatly lined up and have lines showing their orbital path, too, right?

6/23/2012 12:09:59 AM

RapturedbyBlondie

Gravity. Spheres hold the greatest volume in the smallest surface, so things pulled together resemble spheres. Next question?

6/23/2012 3:46:27 AM

Philbert McAdamia

Obviously, S-22 has studied the planets, and I mean all of them, and found them nearly identical. And all perfectly round, with only one day to round off after the bang, 6,000 years ago.
If there was one in the shape of a '53 Chevy BelAir, I'd like to move there.

6/23/2012 7:11:33 AM

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