Quote# 142814

[RageFuel] Incels and autists are nothing but cheap labour to society

Society doesn’t care about us in any other way than our ability to perform simple, repetitive tasks for little pay. Once we lose that ability of get tired, our value goes down to zero.

-In highschool I was always the observer
. An observer of people in relationships, watching people kiss, standing in corners while normal kids experienced victory, friendship, happiness travel and all the majestic things normal people get to experience. In groups I was always the one who never said anything, infact nobody knew I was even there

Fast forward to age 23: All anybody cares about is my ability to hold down a job. As soon as I began experiencing medical symptoms, my co-workers went from somewhat nice and acknowledging of me to cold and mean. After being invisible in my youth, I’ve lost what little value I have to people; my ability to lift things and clean things

Actually Autistic, incels.is 7 Comments [3/14/2019 5:32:29 PM]
Fundie Index: 4
Submitted By: Pharaoh Bastethotep

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Doubting Thomas

Dude, it's not just incels who get treated that way... lots of people get stuck in shit jobs like that because corporations are often about the bottom line and tend to treat their employees like shit. That's why you suck it up and do your job to the best you can or find a better job elsewhere.

-In highschool I was always the observer
. An observer of people in relationships, watching people kiss, standing in corners while normal kids experienced victory, friendship, happiness travel and all the majestic things normal people get to experience.


High school is not real life. How many of those kids got to "happiness travel" because their parents paid for it? I doubt very many paid for any such trips on their own.

Fast forward to age 23: All anybody cares about is my ability to hold down a job.


Welcome to adulthood. I'm 47 and I feel like this at times.

3/15/2019 5:37:25 AM

K

"Fast forward" to 23? That's more of a 'blink and you miss it' duration.

You describe how I felt in high school and how I felt for about the first quarter of my enlistment in the Navy.

Once I got experience, confidence, skills, and became the guy people came to for answers, that stopped being the case, though.

From where I stand, you're still a kid. It'll get better.

3/15/2019 5:52:31 AM

Anon-e-moose

So many of your ilk are on 'Neetbux'.

Your move, OP.

3/15/2019 7:47:08 AM

Thinking Allowed

As soon as I began experiencing medical symptoms, my co-workers went from somewhat nice and acknowledging of me to cold and mean.


Whining about your chosen lot in life is not a medical symptom.

3/15/2019 8:22:50 AM

marxlover

Well incels over there, it's actually called capitalism :)

3/15/2019 9:06:02 PM

Chloe

People can and do become shitty. I don't know what kind of medical symptoms you developed but but companies do have a low tolerance for health issues. My previous PTL asked that we ask for days off if we feel like we're going to be sick and several co-workers were let go for being sick too much (like 3 times if I remember right).

3/16/2019 6:25:27 AM

Swede

Does society care about anyone in any other way than being useful to society?

How old are people in high school? In Sweden, secondary school begins at 16. That's when I got my first friends. A month after my eighteenth birthday, I found my first boyfriend (my now-husband).

Travel? The first time I left Scandinavia was on a bus-trip to Amsterdam at 16. Then school-trips to Hungary and to Hamburg. 2011, when I was 42, we went on holiday to Greece to celebrate mother-in-law's 70th birthday. After that I've traveled quite a lot, to Turkey (first and only time I've left Europe), Berlin, Mallorca, Berlin, Mallorca, Berlin, Crete, London, Munich, Rhodes and Berlin. Funnily enough, it was hubby and me holding down good jobs that made it possible for us to travel this much.

My teachers in school all said I ought to talk more. Most of the Talks I've had with managers over the years have mentioned "you must talk more, take up more space, make your presence known". I HAVE talked more, taken up more space, over the years, but then a new manager comes along who doesn't know how quiet I was before, and it all starts over again. This is also now, at age 49, but my now-manager acknowledges that I am getting better.

Holding down a job IS what's important in society, as that makes you able to support yourself. When you have a proper salary, that's when you can do fun stuff in life as well.

Fast forward to 23? The brain isn't "done" until about 25 years of age. You're basically a teenager, still a child in many aspects.

I've had "medical symptoms" since I was 24 and got epilepsy. If you count nearsightedness, it began at age 10. At age 45, I was diagnosed with high blood pressure. My co-workers are still nice and acknowledging of me, very caring, and want me to be there, as I'm the one who's worked there longest and have the most knowledge. According to my manager (who sits one floor above us), my very presence keeps my colleagues (six younger men) quieter than when I'm not there.

Huh, that's funny. My life doesn't sound so different from yours, Actually. The difference is that I saw me as the "active agent" in my life; if I don't do stuff, stuff won't happen. You seem to just wait for others to make your life "majestic".

I'm no expert on the autistic spectrum, but you sound more like Asperger than autistic. You know who has Aspergers? 16-year-old Greta Thunberg who has started a climate movement that has spread all over the world. She's talked at international conferences and is nominated (with over 200 others, sure) to the Nobel Peace Prize. She's not waiting for someone else to fix her life.

Many people who have severe autism also have severe developmental problems and are "burdens" to society, rather than cheap labor.

3/17/2019 10:20:57 AM

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