Quote# 127344

Shakespeare and abortion

William Shakespeare's masterpiece play Hamlet contains implied references to an attempted abortion by taking abortifacients and the subsequently tragic fate of both the mother (Ophelia) and father (Hamlet). Multiple lines in the play are unmistakable in suggesting this,[1] yet liberals never mention this while teaching about Hamlet in public school.

Shakespeare's portrayal of the wealthy, privileged Ophelia and Hamlet as borderline crazy and suicidal may reflect his disapproval of abortion, and his belief that fate is not kind to those who embrace unapologetically that path and outlook. Shakespeare himself was a devout Christian.

Feminists generally identify with Ophelia as being a victim of men, and if she attempted an abortion then that would be lockstep with feminist ideology. But the unnecessarily tragic outcome awaiting Ophelia after making her immoral choices is something feminists tend to be in denial about.

Andy Schlafly, Conservapedia 21 Comments [5/21/2017 2:07:51 PM]
Fundie Index: 10
Submitted By: Night Jaguar

Username  (Login)
Comment  (Text formatting help) 

1 | bottom

Citizen Justin

Never heard of this before. Not in two years of studying the play, no. Though Andy would no doubt say that that was because I was at a 'public school' (state funded 6th form college).

Here is the article he cites, for anybody who doesn't want to increase Crapedia's web traffic: http://craftyscreenwriting.com/ophelia.html

It's an interesting interpretation but as with everything Andy has to draw a 'liberals are bad conservatives are good' analogy, which suggests that living or working with him must be very tiresome.

Alos, WTFd.

5/21/2017 2:59:48 PM


dxdydz

@Pharaoh Bastethotep

Lol

5/21/2017 3:12:57 PM

RenegadePromQueen

Someone explain the fair youth and dark lady stuff to him. I'd like to see him reconcile that with his image of good old jittery javelin as a fundie.

Oh, also: Sonnet 129.

5/21/2017 3:14:15 PM

RenegadePromQueen

@Pharaoh Bastethotep

This is genius!

5/21/2017 3:27:16 PM



They don't discuss it because it's bullshit

5/21/2017 4:32:00 PM

CrowFood

So...my degree is in Literature, and I haven't heard the abortion idea before.

Pregnant, yes, and suicidal because of what she goes through, but not the abortion part. The herbs she gathers could be used that way, but they have a lot of other, far more common uses.

Also...abortion means you deserve to go crazy and die? Don't know what I expect, but this is why you're a shitbag

5/21/2017 5:15:36 PM

Thinking Allowed

Hey Andy, the bible talks about abortion, how to do it, and when it's appropriate. You should look into it sometime.

5/21/2017 5:30:49 PM

Shepard Solus

Multiple lines in the play are unmistakable in suggesting this,[1] yet liberals never mention this while teaching about Hamlet in public school.

Possibly because it is of zero importance if it's even true (and given that it's coming from you, it's all but guaranteed to be false).

Shakespeare's portrayal of the wealthy, privileged Ophelia and Hamlet as borderline crazy and suicidal may reflect his disapproval of abortion, and his belief that fate is not kind to those who embrace unapologetically that path and outlook. Shakespeare himself was a devout Christian.

The Bible's portrayal of abortion as an acceptable response to situations of suspect fidelity and a frequent punishment from Yahweh may reflect his approval of abortion, and his belief that a foetus isn't a person simply by virtue of having human DNA. Yahweh himself was an avid child-killer.

5/21/2017 8:00:26 PM

The Angry Dybbuk

I never read abortion into Hamlet and I studied it at a Christian uni. I do know abortion is metioned in the Bible, however, in the vague discussion about the curse of bitter water or even more famously in the passage about a woman being struck so that 'her fruit depart'; if nothing else happens, the responsible party has to pay the husband what he demands (which is a little much if premature birth were the intended interpretation). If the woman dies, the responsible party faces the same fate (Exodus 21:.22-23).

5/21/2017 8:49:30 PM

Kanna

Andy, you've already failed as a commentator on life. (I know, not all your fault, you were not raised in a thinking family.) But what in triple-decker bacon burgers makes you think you have any skills in critiquing English literature?

5/21/2017 9:17:09 PM

Prager

Crazy liberals don't mention it because, maybe, it's not really there. That stuff in your hands is called straw, Andy.

5/22/2017 12:41:53 AM

Prager

@Pharaoh Bastethotep

It really loses something in the translation. LOL

5/22/2017 12:43:57 AM

Mister Spak

Ophelia and Hamlet sound like a couple of conservatives.

5/22/2017 4:36:03 AM

Anon-e-moose

You have not experienced Shakespeare until you have read him in the original Klingon


-Chancellor Gorkon (David Warner), "Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country"

The KJV has also been translated into Klingon.

It's said that existing works translated into Klingon gains something in the translation.

Perhaps a certain 'version' of the Bible could do with the same treatment Andy Schaftafly, you petaQ!


5/22/2017 8:37:21 AM

Alencon

@Thinking Allowed

"Hey Andy, the bible talks about abortion, how to do it, and when it's appropriate. You should look into it sometime."

It does? That's news to me. You wouldn't have a reference would you?

5/22/2017 10:56:45 AM

Alencon

One has to wonder how Andy's mother abused him as a child to make him so fucked up?

5/22/2017 1:39:18 PM

The Angry Dybbuk

@ Alencon:

Since you weren't asking me, I can only guess, but maybe Numbers 5:24. There's a less vague comment in Exodus 21:22-23.

5/22/2017 3:24:02 PM

Mathius_dragoon

I thought Hamlet was about a prince avenging his father's murder and taking his rightful place as king? Not sure what any of this rambling has to do with that.

5/22/2017 4:10:27 PM

Titania

We could apply this one to Schlafly:

Madam, I swear I use no art at all.
That he is mad, 'tis true: 'tis true 'tis pity;
And pity 'tis 'tis true: a foolish figure;
But farewell it, for I will use no art.
Mad let us grant him, then: and now remains
That we find out the cause of this effect,
Or rather say, the cause of this defect,
For this effect defective comes by cause:
Thus it remains, and the remainder thus.

Hamlet Act II, Scene 2

5/22/2017 7:14:48 PM

Doubting Thomas

Is there any historic figure whose beliefs Andy won't twist around to making it look like they agree with him?

5/23/2017 7:28:11 AM

1 | top: comments page